Tour through the park

Marie Th eresia T or Meidlinger T or Haup t tor Hietziger T or Meiereitor Haup t tor Marie Th eresia T or Meidlinger T or Hietziger T or Meiereitor
Sc h önbrunner Schlossstraße Ti v oligasse Grünbe r gstraße Marie Th eresia T or Meidlinger T or Haup t tor Hietziger T or Meiereitor 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45
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Blue Staircase

1a

Antechamber

1b

Aides-de-Camp Room

1

Guards Room

2

Billiard Room

3

Audience Chamber

4

Emperor Franz Joseph’s Study

Ketterl Room

5

Franz Joseph’s Bedroom

6

Western Terrace Cabinet

7

Stairs Cabinet

8

Dressing Room

9

Imperial Couple’s Bedroom

10

Salon of Empress Elisabeth

11

Marie Antoinette Room

12

Salon of the Archduchess Portraits

13

Breakfast Cabinet

14

Yellow Salon

15

Balcony Room

16

Hall of Mirrors

17

Large Rosa Room

18

Second Small Rosa Room

19

First Small Rosa Room

20

Lantern Room

21

Great Gallery

22

Small Gallery

23

Round Chinese Cabinet

24

Oval Chinese Cabinet

25

Carousel Room

26

Hall of Ceremonies

27

Stallions' Room

28

Blue Chinese Salon

29

Vieux Laque Room

30

Napoleon Room

31

Porcelain Room

32

Millions Room

33

Gobelin Salon

34

Archduchess Sophie’s Study

35

Red Salon

36

Eastern Terrace Cabinet

37

Rich Room

38

Study of Archduke Franz Karl

39

Salon of Archduke Franz Karl

40

Hunting Room

1

Bergl Rooms

2

White-and-Gold Rooms

3

Palace Chapel

4

Children’s Museum Schönbrunn Palace

5

The Crown Prince Apartment

Great Parterre

Statues in the Great Parterre

Rhea Kybele

Alexander and Olympias

Cincinnatus

Roman Matron

Eurydice

Hesperia and Arethusa

Diana (by J. B. Hagenauer)

Apollo (by J. B. Hagenauer)

Hercules

Monument for Philipp Franz Siebold

Franz Stephan

Joseph II

The Family Monument

Maze

Neptune Fountain

Gloriette

Small Gloriette

Obelisk Fountain

Roman Ruin

Schönbrunner Bad

Columbary

Fair Spring

Angel Fountain

Parade Court Fountains

Naiad Fountains

Privy Garden

Orangery

Apothekertrakt

Carriage Museum

Zoo

Palm House

Desert House

Palm House Garden and Botanic Garden

Panoramabahn

Original Viennese strudel show

Marionette Theatre at Schönbrunn Palace

Schoenbrunn Palace Concerts

Schlosstheater Schönbrunn

ORANG.erie

Virtual Reality

Austria Trend Hotels

Restaurant in the Schönbrunnerbad

Café Restaurant Residenz & Court Bakery

Café Gloriette

Gasthaus Tirolergarten

Café Restaurant Kaiserpavillon

Restaurant Kutscher G'wölb

Landtmann's Jausen Station

Schönbrunner Schlosscafé

Restaurant & Heuriger Joseph II.

Schönbrunner Stöckl

Eis Greissler

Great Parterre

In keeping with the principles of Baroque horticultural design, gardens were an expression of a ruler’s status and as such were as a rule related to the architecture of the palace, being an extension of its magnificent interiors.

Statues in the Great Parterre

When the hill at Schönbrunn was landscaped it was decided to redesign the Great Parterre at the same time.

Rhea Kybele

Also the boskets were decorated with statues by Christian Willhelm Beyer and Johann Baptist Hagenauer.

Alexander and Olympias

Also the boskets were decorated with statues by Christian Willhelm Beyer and Johann Baptist Hagenauer.

Cincinnatus

Also the boskets were decorated with statues by Christian Willhelm Beyer and Johann Baptist Hagenauer.

Roman Matron

Also the boskets were decorated with statues by Christian Willhelm Beyer and Johann Baptist Hagenauer.

Eurydice

Also the boskets were decorated with statues by Christian Willhelm Beyer and Johann Baptist Hagenauer.

Hesperia and Arethusa

Also the boskets were decorated with statues by Christian Willhelm Beyer and Johann Baptist Hagenauer.

Diana (by J. B. Hagenauer)

Also the boskets were decorated with statues by Christian Willhelm Beyer and Johann Baptist Hagenauer.

Apollo (by J. B. Hagenauer)

Also the boskets were decorated with statues by Christian Willhelm Beyer and Johann Baptist Hagenauer.

Hercules

Also the boskets were decorated with statues by Christian Willhelm Beyer and Johann Baptist Hagenauer.

Monument for Philipp Franz Siebold

The base displays a portrait of Siebold.

Franz Stephan

One year after the sudden death of Franz Stephan in 1765, Maria Theresa commissioned a bronze bust of her much-loved husband.

Joseph II

In 1810 a monument was erected to Joseph II.

The Family Monument

Commissioned from Franz Thaler in 1802.

Maze

The Maze at Schönbrunn was laid out around 1720 and originally had four quadrants with a central (probably elevated) pavilion.

Neptune Fountain

Designed as the crowning element of the Great Parterre, and sited at the foot of the hill behind the palace is the Neptune Fountain, which was conceived as part of the overall design of the gardens and park commissioned by Maria Theresa in the 1770s.

Gloriette

The Early Classicistic colonnaded Gloriette was built to Hohenberg's designs on the crest of the hill in 1775.

Small Gloriette

Situated in the middle of the wooded hillside on the eastern side of the park is the Small Gloriette, a tower-like, two-story pavilion built between 1755 and 1772 and probably based on a design by court architect Nikolaus Pacassi.

Obelisk Fountain

Also situated at the foot of Schönbrunn Hill, the Obelisk Fountain constitutes the visual focus at the end of the eastern diagonal avenue, and together with the Gloriette and the Zoo is one of the most important focal points in the gardens.

Roman Ruin

Originally called the Ruin of Carthage, the Roman Ruin stands at the foot of the wooded slopes of Schönbrunn Hill.

Schönbrunner Bad

www.schoenbrunnerbad.at

Columbary

Built at some time between 1750 and 1776, the Columbary or dovecote is a tall, circular aviary constructed of wire mesh with a dome-like copper roof crowned by a lantern-like structure. Four walled alcoves were added to provide the doves with roosting space.

Fair Spring

Tucked into the corner of a hedged walk on the Meidling (east) side of the park is the Fair Spring. The first well house on this site is thought to have been built by the court gardener Adrian van Steckhoven, but this was replaced by a new structure designed by court architect Isidor Canevale in 1771.

Angel Fountain

The Angel Fountain is probably one of the sculptural features with which the park as a whole was provided around 1777.

Parade Court Fountains

The group of figures in the western basin were made by Franz Anton Zauner and represent the rivers Danube, Inn and Enns.

Naiad Fountains

At the intersection of each of the two stelliform systems of avenues on either side of the park at Schönbrunn is a rondeau or circular open space containing at its centre a pool with sculptural figures known as the Naiad Fountain.

Privy Garden

Meidling Privy Gardens: Crown Prince Garden and the Garden on the Cellar - Dating to around 1745/50, the plans for the laying out of the Meidling Privy Gardens were probably drawn up by the Lotharingian garden designer Louis Gervais.

Orangery

As far back as the time of the dowager empress Wilhelmine Amalie an orangery garden was established at Schönbrunn which included a hothouse for overwintering the tender citrus trees. In 1754 Franz I Stephan instigated the building of the Orangery by Nikolaus Pacassi, probably to designs by Nicolas Jadot.

Apothekertrakt

to Apothekertrakt

Carriage Museum

In 1922 the most important part of the collection of carriages used by the imperial family and Viennese court, including state coaches, ceremonial and gala carriages, sleighs and sedan chairs, was transferred from the imperial court stables at the Vienna Hofburg (part of today’s Museumsquartier) to Schönbrunn and housed in the former winter riding school which had been specially adapted for this purpose.

Zoo

Like the Dutch Botanical Garden at Schönbrunn, the Menagerie was originally founded by Emperor Franz I Stephan, who had a profound interest in natural history.

Palm House

The Palm House is located on the site of the former Dutch Botanical Garden and was erected in 1881/2 to designs by Franz Xaver Segenschmid.

Desert House

Emperor Franz Joseph I commissioned a hothouse based on designs by the architect Alfons Custodis for the overwintering of his extensive and extremely valuable ‘New Holland Collection’, mainly containing botanical specimens from Australia and South Africa.

Palm House Garden and Botanic Garden

In 1753, Maria Theresa’s husband, Emperor Franz I Stephan, who was a keen amateur natural scientist, bought a neglected enclosed field from the neighbouring village of Hietzing, on which he had a ‘Dutch Botanical Garden’ laid out.

Panoramabahn

The grounds of Schönbrunn, a World Heritage Site, cover 160 hectares. Visitors can ride in comfort to all of its attractions on the diesel-powered Schönbrunn Panorama Train.

to the Panoramabahn

Original Viennese strudel show

Original Wiener Strudelshow

Marionette Theatre at Schönbrunn Palace

Two-and-a-half centuries of tradition meet state-of-the-art stagecraft: enjoy princely entertainment like at the court of Empress Maria Theresa, performed with priceless hand-crafted figures.

The playing technique of this theatre has been added to the UNESCO list of Intangible Cultural Heritage. Performances take place all year round as full-length evening productions for adults: see Mozart’s Magic Flute in a humorous production with that special Viennese charm, or the thrilling musical Sisi’s Secret about the legendary Empress Elisabeth.

www.marionettentheater.at

Schoenbrunn Palace Concerts

Daily at 8.30 pm

The Schoenbrunn Palace Orchestra awaits you at the Palace Orangery where Mozart himself performed in 1786. The concert is a fine selection of masterful music by Mozart and Strauss, rounded off by dance and vocal performances.

Exclusive packages with palace tour, dinner & concert available.

Book here: www.imagevienna.com

Schlosstheater Schönbrunn

to Schlosstheater Schönbrunn

ORANG.erie

to ORANG.erie

Virtual Reality

Take a seat in the apartment of the Crown Prince at Schönbrunn Palace and immerse yourself in the world of the Habsburgs. With the latest VR technology, you will be taken on a journey back to the time of the Austrian Empire, where you will experience up-close many historical moments and witness the incredible history of Schönbrunn Palace.

Austria Trend Hotels

In a imperial setting with a spacious 167 m² at their disposal, guests can wine and dine like an emperor and bed down like a princess. A project that is unique throughout Europe has come to life in the suite in Schönbrunn Palace. In partnership with Austra Trend Hotels Schönbrunn Palace gives you the chance to stay overnight in one of the most famous treasures of Austria’s cultural heritage.

Reservations:
Schloß Schönbrunn Suite, Austria Trend Hotels
Tel. +43 1 878 04
thesuite.at
office@austria-trend.at

Restaurant in the Schönbrunnerbad

Schönbrunner Schlosspark 1, 1130 Wien

Tel.: +43 1 8175353

www.luvbeachclub.com

Café Restaurant Residenz & Court Bakery

Welcome to Café Residenz and the Court Bakery!
Experience imperial hospitality at Schönbrunn Palace.

Schloß Schönbrunn / Kavalierstrakt, 1130 Wien

Tel.: +43 1 24 100-312
Fax: +43 1 24 100-319

residenz@cafe-wien.at
www.cafe-residenz.at

Café Gloriette

Schlosspark Schönbrunn, 1130 Wien

Tel.: +43 1 879 13 11
Fax: +43 1 879 13 11-11

office@gloriette-cafe.at
www.gloriette-cafe.at

Gasthaus Tirolergarten

Schlosspark Schönbrunn, 1130 Wien

Tel.: +43 1 879 3556-20
Fax: +43 1 879 3556-52

office@zoovienna-gastro.at
www.gasthaustirolergarten.at

Café Restaurant Kaiserpavillon

Maxingstraße 13 b, 1130 Wien

Tel.: +43 1 879 3556-10
Fax: +43 1 879 3556-12

office@zoovienna-gastro.at
www.zoovienna-gastro.at

Restaurant Kutscher G'wölb

Schloß Schönbrunn / Hausdienergang, 1130 Wien

Tel.: +43 1 877 22 16 12

restaurant@steinmetz-gastro.at
www.kutschergwoelb.at

Landtmann's Jausen Station

The Hideaway at Schönbrunn

www.landtmann-jausenstation.at

Schönbrunner Schlosscafé

Welcome to Schönbrunner Schloßcafé!
At Gardetrakt

Apart from specialty coffees and teas we serve various types of breakfast (available all day) as well as a wide range of typical Viennese cakes, pastries and hot snacks. A special attraction is our outdoor seating area with its magnificent view of Schönbrunn Palace.
Schönbrunner Schloßstraße 47, 1130 Vienna
Tel.: +43 1 810 3259
Fax: +43 1 810 3259
cafe.schoenbrunn@lagardere-tr.at
We do not accept reservations. For opening hours please call Schönbrunner Schloßcafé.

Restaurant & Heuriger Joseph II.

Located in a side wing of Schönbrunn Palace, the Heuriger "Joseph II" invites you to enjoy delicious Viennese Heurigen delicacies and a variety of Viennese wines. In the midst of one of the most popular cultural sites in the world, you can enjoy a hearty piece of Viennese Heurigen culture.

Schönbrunn Palace
Kontrollorstöckl,  Schönbrunner Schloßstraße 47, A-1130 Vienna

+43 (0)1 934 62 20
OFFICE@HEURIGERSCHOENBRUNN.AT

WWW.HEURIGERSCHOENBRUNN.AT

Schönbrunner Stöckl

Restaurant and Dinnertheatre

at the Meidling Gate

Tel.: +43 (0) 660 63 63 200

office@trojani.com
www.schoenbrunnerstoeckl.com
www.dinnertheater.wien

From July - September Summerstage with live music- free entrance

Friday & Saturday from 5 p.m // Sunday from 1 p.m.

Eis Greissler

Icecream trucks at the Schönbrunn area

From April to October, ice cream trucks from "Eis Greissler" provide refreshments on the area of Schönbrunn!

www.eis-greissler.at

Bergl Rooms

As she grew older, Maria Theresa increasingly suffered from the heat during the summer months. In the last decade of her life she therefore had a suite furnished for herself on the ground floor of the palace.

White-and-Gold Rooms

These rooms with their unforgettable flair provide the perfect setting for special events. You can hire these four rooms singly or together – whether it's for a dinner, concert, cocktail reception or a presentation, an invitation to an event at Schönbrunn Palace is always gladly accepted.

Palace Chapel

The palace chapel at Schönbrunn today still bears witness to the location, spatial structure and architectural articulation of the original palace designed by Johann Bernhard Fischer von Erlach around 1700.

Children’s Museum Schönbrunn Palace

Find out the difference between imperial children and children from ordinary families by using our time wheel. You can play with toys that were used in those days, learn the fascinating secret language of fans, and set the table for an imperial dinner!

The Crown Prince Apartment

Crown Prince Rudolf, the only son of Emperor Franz Joseph and Empress Elisabeth, used this suite of rooms on the ground floor of the palace as a private apartment during his stays in Schönbrunn.

Blue Staircase

The Blue Staircase is the grandest stairway in the palace. Providing the highest-ranking access to the state rooms and residential apartments of the imperial family, it leads only to the principal floor of the palace.

Antechamber

Situated between the Blue Staircase and the private apartments of Emperor Franz Joseph and Empress Elisabeth in the west wing of the palace are a number of anterooms, acting as a sort of ‘buffer zone’.

Aides-de-Camp Room

Aides-de-camp were army officers assigned to the emperor’s personal service. Officers appointed to this position of trust alternated with one another on a round-the-clock rota.

Guards Room

In this room guards were posted to stand sentinel over access to the apartments of the emperor and empress.

Billiard Room

Franz Joseph saw himself first and foremost as an officer of his army. Appropriately, the subject of the large-format paintings in this room is the Military Order of Maria Theresa, the highest military order of merit of the Habsburg Monarchy. 

Audience Chamber

Here the emperor received individuals who had been granted a private audience with the monarch. Members of the government, high-ranking military officers and court officials were also summoned here several times a week to deliver their reports.

Emperor Franz Joseph’s Study

A host of personal pictures and photographs bear witness to the style of interior favoured by the emperor in his private quarters. Over the course of his long life he amassed in this room a wealth of mementos of his wife Elisabeth, their four children and thirteen grandchildren.

Ketterl Room

The concealed door in the back wall of the study leads into the valet de chambre’s room.

Franz Joseph’s Bedroom

The emperor’s bedroom was where the monarch died on 21 November 1916.

Western Terrace Cabinet

This small room leads into the apartments of Empress Elisabeth.

Stairs Cabinet

The Stairs Cabinet served Empress Elisabeth as a writing room. Here she wrote her letters, journals and her poetry. The bookcase contains part of her personal library.

Dressing Room

Immediately adjacent to the bedroom, the dressing room was the innermost and most private room in the empress’s apartments.

Imperial Couple’s Bedroom

The bedroom initially shared by Franz Joseph and Elisabeth was furnished and decorated for their marriage in 1854.

Salon of Empress Elisabeth

This was Elisabeth’s reception room. The Rococo Revival interior is a typical example of the furnishing and decoration of a state room at the Viennese court during the reign of Emperor Franz Joseph.

Marie Antoinette Room

During the time when Elisabeth occupied these apartments, the Marie Antoinette Room was the family dining room, used for small dinners in the immediate family circle and attended by the imperial couple and their children, and later on their daughter and sons-in law and grandchildren.

Salon of the Archduchess Portraits

This room with its Rococo Revival décor once belonged to the apartments occupied by Empress Elisabeth. Today it contains the famous series of portraits of Maria Theresa’s daughters, and is therefore also sometimes known as the Children’s Room.

Breakfast Cabinet

This little corner room owes its pleasing character to the textile flower pictures set into the wall panelling in gilt frames.

Yellow Salon

The Yellow Salon is the first room in the apartments facing the palace gardens. From the windows of these rooms one has a stunning view of the main parterre with the Gloriette as the lofty termination of the vista.

Balcony Room

The numerous pictures in the Balcony Room show Maria Theresa and her children. The portraits are from the studio of court painter Martin van Meytens.

Hall of Mirrors

The Hall of Mirrors with its magnificent gilt Rococo décor is a classic example of a state room from the epoch of Maria Theresa.

Large Rosa Room

The three Rosa Rooms are named after the artist Joseph Rosa, who executed fifteen landscape paintings for the ensemble at the behest of Maria Theresa in the 1760s.

Second Small Rosa Room

Consisting of one large room and two adjoining smaller rooms, the Rosa Rooms form an ensemble with uniform décor.

First Small Rosa Room

The paintings by Joseph Rosa show idealized scenery from Italy and the Alpine countries.

Lantern Room

Located next to the Blue Staircase, the Lantern Room is the anteroom to the palace’s ceremonial hall, the Great Gallery.

Great Gallery

With a length of 43 metres and a breadth of almost ten metres, the Great Gallery was the ideal setting for courtly events. The magnificent interior with its gilt stucco decoration and ceiling frescos represents the epitome of Rococo art.

Small Gallery

Lying on the central axis of the palace, the Small Gallery together with the two smaller rooms on either side served as a setting for courtly entertainments. 

Round Chinese Cabinet

Half-concealed to either side of the Small Gallery lie two highlights among the historic state rooms of the palace: two cabinets lying opposite each other in mirror-image, both decorated with a rich array of works of art from China and Japan.

Oval Chinese Cabinet

The Oval Chinese Cabinet forms the counterpart to the Round Cabinet lying on the opposite side of the Small Gallery. Both rooms have similar décor but differ in the shape of their ground plan.

Carousel Room

The Carousel Room or First Antechamber acted as a ‘buffer zone’ between the Great Gallery and the apartments occupied by the imperial couple Maria Theresa and Franz Stephan in the East Wing of the palace.

Hall of Ceremonies

At the court of Maria Theresa the Hall of Ceremonies served as the Second or Great Antechamber. Here, enthroned under the canopy of state, the monarch received her guests in audience. Today this place is occupied by probably the most famous portrait of Maria Theresa, showing her as the ‘First Lady of Europe’ in a sumptuous gown of Brabant lace.

Stallions' Room

In the nineteenth century the Stallions' Room served as a dining room. That is why a festively decked table is on display here, faithfully copying a view of the room dating from the middle of the nineteenth century.

Blue Staircase

The Blue Staircase is the grandest stairway in the palace. Providing the highest-ranking access to the state rooms and residential apartments of the imperial family, it leads only to the principal floor of the palace.

Antechamber

Situated between the Blue Staircase and the private apartments of Emperor Franz Joseph and Empress Elisabeth in the west wing of the palace are a number of anterooms, acting as a sort of ‘buffer zone’.

Aides-de-Camp Room

Aides-de-camp were army officers assigned to the emperor’s personal service. Officers appointed to this position of trust alternated with one another on a round-the-clock rota.

Guards Room

In this room guards were posted to stand sentinel over access to the apartments of the emperor and empress.

Billiard Room

Franz Joseph saw himself first and foremost as an officer of his army. Appropriately, the subject of the large-format paintings in this room is the Military Order of Maria Theresa, the highest military order of merit of the Habsburg Monarchy. 

Audience Chamber

Here the emperor received individuals who had been granted a private audience with the monarch. Members of the government, high-ranking military officers and court officials were also summoned here several times a week to deliver their reports.

Emperor Franz Joseph’s Study

A host of personal pictures and photographs bear witness to the style of interior favoured by the emperor in his private quarters. Over the course of his long life he amassed in this room a wealth of mementos of his wife Elisabeth, their four children and thirteen grandchildren.

Ketterl Room

The concealed door in the back wall of the study leads into the valet de chambre’s room.

Franz Joseph’s Bedroom

The emperor’s bedroom was where the monarch died on 21 November 1916.

Western Terrace Cabinet

This small room leads into the apartments of Empress Elisabeth.

Stairs Cabinet

The Stairs Cabinet served Empress Elisabeth as a writing room. Here she wrote her letters, journals and her poetry. The bookcase contains part of her personal library.

Dressing Room

Immediately adjacent to the bedroom, the dressing room was the innermost and most private room in the empress’s apartments.

Imperial Couple’s Bedroom

The bedroom initially shared by Franz Joseph and Elisabeth was furnished and decorated for their marriage in 1854.

Salon of Empress Elisabeth

This was Elisabeth’s reception room. The Rococo Revival interior is a typical example of the furnishing and decoration of a state room at the Viennese court during the reign of Emperor Franz Joseph.

Marie Antoinette Room

During the time when Elisabeth occupied these apartments, the Marie Antoinette Room was the family dining room, used for small dinners in the immediate family circle and attended by the imperial couple and their children, and later on their daughter and sons-in law and grandchildren.

Salon of the Archduchess Portraits

This room with its Rococo Revival décor once belonged to the apartments occupied by Empress Elisabeth. Today it contains the famous series of portraits of Maria Theresa’s daughters, and is therefore also sometimes known as the Children’s Room.

Breakfast Cabinet

This little corner room owes its pleasing character to the textile flower pictures set into the wall panelling in gilt frames.

Yellow Salon

The Yellow Salon is the first room in the apartments facing the palace gardens. From the windows of these rooms one has a stunning view of the main parterre with the Gloriette as the lofty termination of the vista.

Balcony Room

The numerous pictures in the Balcony Room show Maria Theresa and her children. The portraits are from the studio of court painter Martin van Meytens.

Hall of Mirrors

The Hall of Mirrors with its magnificent gilt Rococo décor is a classic example of a state room from the epoch of Maria Theresa.

Large Rosa Room

The three Rosa Rooms are named after the artist Joseph Rosa, who executed fifteen landscape paintings for the ensemble at the behest of Maria Theresa in the 1760s.

Second Small Rosa Room

Consisting of one large room and two adjoining smaller rooms, the Rosa Rooms form an ensemble with uniform décor.

First Small Rosa Room

The paintings by Joseph Rosa show idealized scenery from Italy and the Alpine countries.

Lantern Room

Located next to the Blue Staircase, the Lantern Room is the anteroom to the palace’s ceremonial hall, the Great Gallery.

Great Gallery

With a length of 43 metres and a breadth of almost ten metres, the Great Gallery was the ideal setting for courtly events. The magnificent interior with its gilt stucco decoration and ceiling frescos represents the epitome of Rococo art.

Small Gallery

Lying on the central axis of the palace, the Small Gallery together with the two smaller rooms on either side served as a setting for courtly entertainments. 

Round Chinese Cabinet

Half-concealed to either side of the Small Gallery lie two highlights among the historic state rooms of the palace: two cabinets lying opposite each other in mirror-image, both decorated with a rich array of works of art from China and Japan.

Oval Chinese Cabinet

The Oval Chinese Cabinet forms the counterpart to the Round Cabinet lying on the opposite side of the Small Gallery. Both rooms have similar décor but differ in the shape of their ground plan.

Carousel Room

The Carousel Room or First Antechamber acted as a ‘buffer zone’ between the Great Gallery and the apartments occupied by the imperial couple Maria Theresa and Franz Stephan in the East Wing of the palace.

Hall of Ceremonies

At the court of Maria Theresa the Hall of Ceremonies served as the Second or Great Antechamber. Here, enthroned under the canopy of state, the monarch received her guests in audience. Today this place is occupied by probably the most famous portrait of Maria Theresa, showing her as the ‘First Lady of Europe’ in a sumptuous gown of Brabant lace.

Stallions' Room

In the nineteenth century the Stallions' Room served as a dining room. That is why a festively decked table is on display here, faithfully copying a view of the room dating from the middle of the nineteenth century.

Blue Chinese Salon

The Blue Chinese Salon marks the start of the apartments occupied by Maria Theresa and her husband Franz Stephan – a suite of rooms that are distinguished by their particularly sumptuous interiors.

Vieux Laque Room

In terms of its art-historical significance, the Vieux Laque Room is among the most important interiors at Schönbrunn. The black lacquer panels from China lend the room an impression of sumptuous magnificence.

Napoleon Room

Known today as the Napoleon Room, the room was refurbished several times during the nineteenth century. When it was restored in 2007 the decision was taken to highlight various phases of its past decoration and make this visible to visitors.

Porcelain Room

This small room served Maria Theresa as a private writing room. It has a particularly private character and bears witness to the monarch’s personal tastes. The décor not only displays the empress’s love of the chinoiserie fashion of the times but was partly made by members of her family.

Millions Room

The interior of the Millions Room is particularly extravagant and sumptuous. In the ceremonial sequence of rooms prescribed for the Viennese court, Maria Theresa used this room, originally known as the Mirrors Room, to receive guests for private audiences.

Gobelin Salon

Both the walls and the armchairs in this room are covered with valuable tapestries: the backs and seats of the six chairs each show representations of two months together with the signs of the Zodiac.

Archduchess Sophie’s Study

Franz Joseph’s ambitious mother Archduchess Sophie not only energetically pursued her goal of putting her son on the Austrian throne but was also his most important political advisor. Contemporaries famously referred to the archduchess ‘the only man at the Viennese Court’.

Red Salon

Known today as the Red Salon, this room is decorated in the style typical of the later years of Emperor Franz Joseph’s reign. The room is characterized by the wall hangings and upholstery in ‘court damask’, a red silk damask with a design based on a pineapple-like central motif.

Eastern Terrace Cabinet

This small room is also referred to as the Flower Cabinet in archival sources on account of the garlands of flowers painted on its wall panelling.

Rich Room

The Rich Room does its name full justice: on display here is Maria Theresa’s state bed.

Study of Archduke Franz Karl

The paintings in this room deepen our acquaintance with Maria Theresa’s family.

Salon of Archduke Franz Karl

A glass door allows a view into the corner salon, which is decorated with life-size portraits of Maria Theresa’s children.

Hunting Room

Recalling Schönbrunn’s origins as an imperial hunting lodge, the Hunting Room marks the end of the tour of the main floor of the palace.

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